Introducing the NEW Epixor XT

The Okuma Epixor XT spinning reels are the next generation of a long standing family of spinning reels within the Okuma lineup. Today’s anglers want lightweight reels that they can cast all day and strength and durability to turn and stop even the feistiest of fish. The Epixor XT reels utilize advanced technologies to create both exceptional feel and rock solid durability.

 

The NEW Epixor XT    
   – TCA: Torsion Control Armor reduces twisting
– 7BB+1RB stainless steel bearings
– Quick-Set ant-reverse bearing
– Slow oscillation system for improved line lay
– Corrosion resistant graphite body and rotor
– CFR: Cyclonic Flow Rotor technology
– Machined aluminum, 2-tone anodized spool with LCS lip
– RESII: Computer balanced Rotor Equalizing System

C40X Carbon Technology
NEW C40X Carbon Technology allows for lighter and strong construction than standard graphite. It provide for a rigidity, less weight, and eliminates the chance of reel corrosion.

Centrifugal Disc Bail
Weighted and balanced – the Centrifugal Disc Bail delivers a smooth bail experience


Cyclonic Flow Rotor
The reel also features our Okumas’ new Cyclonic Flow Rotor. This new technological advancement in reel construction increases air flow through the ported rotor to promoting faster drying time.

Progressive Drag
Drag System incorporates more precise and accurate drag settings. The three sizes all contain eight total stainless steel ball bearings and between 11-19lbs of drag out of its multi-disc, Japanese oiled felt drag washers.

Torsion Control Armor
Features Torsion Control Armor which eliminates reel stem twisting and torque while keeping your gears completely aligned. TCA will help get rid of unwanted body twisting by applying pressure on the reel in multiple directions from cranking. It is especially useful for those who enjoy using braided line.

CHECK OUT THE VIDEO BELOW!



 

 

Fishing trip to Jurassic Lake in Argentina

Denis Isbister from Wild Fish Wild Places tells us about his incredible, yet strenuous fishing trip to Jurassic Lake in Argentina.

“The southern end of the Patagonia region close to El Calafate is one of the most unforgiving and inhospitable areas I’ve ever visited in my fishing career. Dry, windy, barren and all around tough conditions make it a much uninhabited area, with the exception of sheep ranches and GIANT rainbow trout!”

According to Denis, Estancia Laguna Verde is the home base of operations for Lago Strobel, or as most have come to call it “Jurassic Lake.” The lodge has many fishing lagoons and depending on the time of year, the creeks are full of great fishing opportunities. Most people go there to chase the big trouts.

Denis, along with his buddy Martin, a 6 year veteran to Elv lodge, decided to make a hike one day to an area they call “the island” and the “aquarium.” Only a small handful of people have fished it the entire season due to the difficulty of the hike. It’s a 3-mile hike over treacherous boulder piles and slick rocks. The guys main focus was getting to the lake to go fishing.

 

Even though the guys were tired from hiking they were determined to go fishing. The next day they drove as far as they could and loaded up their packs for the day. As they made their way down the giant boulder field crawling over rocks, and jumping in between crevasse’s they could hear the splashing of fish eating on the surface. That alone was enough to kick the adrenaline in to overdrive and keep them moving toward their first spot called “the island.”

“As we approached our spot Martin spotted the first fish immediately and lined Dreu up on the mark. As he pulled his olive jig fly loose from his rod and made a cast it was almost automatic, like the fish have never seen a fly….oh wait they haven’t! The fish turned with reckless abandonment and ate the fly like it hadn’t had a meal in a week. The fight was on the fish got airborne 4 or 5 times and made some fast runs finally giving up to the net and Dreu had his first 12 pounder of the trip”

 

 

The morning went on like this for a while with more 8 to 12 pound rainbows getting landed. For the smaller trout the Okuma Celilo rod and the Okuma Inspira reel was used. For the larger trout the Okuma SST Trout rod and the Okuma Helios reel was used.

Denis decided he wanted to explore the area a little so he took his producer and started walking around. “We found a great spot high on the rocks with a deep water shelf within close proximity, perfect for big fish! As we looked around we spotted a nice fish cruising the shoreline and started making some casts to it. After a few rejections we changed colors and started back in with an olive bead head wooly bugger with brown hackle and a brown tail. I made a few casts and finally he bought it, the hook set and the fight was on. This fish knew the game, he immediately took me into the closest rock pile trying to break me free, then the next rock pile and again the next rock pile. This went on for 3 rounds in 4 different rock piles as I chased him one direction trying to keep him locked in when finally, I tired him out. Martin came to the rescue with the net job and landed this Jurassic Lake monster of 18 pounds.

What a day for a hike!

Lassagne’s Victory With The Okuma Helios Rod And Reel At The California B.A.S.S State Qualifier

lassagne _Okuma

 

 

Mark Lassagne qualifies for B.A.S.S. Federation State Team at the California Delta.

A one-two punch claims tidal water trophy.

The decision to stick with two techniques and two areas paid off for the Yamamoto pro, as the event’s anglers found the tidal water system fishing small and tough.

Lassagne’s one-two punch included two Yamamoto presentations – a Senko in depths from 10 to 30 ft and a Flappin’ Hog for shallow punch fish.

The strategy earned Lassagne 12.8 lbs on day one, rocketing him 4 lbs above his nearest competitor. The final day he came to the scales with a limit of 11 lbs, widening his gap by nearly 5 lbs and claiming victory with a tournament total of 24.9lbs.

“It’s not often when you can win a California Delta event with 25 lbs for two days, said Lassagne. “I did it in a limited area, grinding out a limit each day.”

TOOLS
Lassagne tempted the deeper bass with a wacky-rigged, 5 inch, watermelon red Senko, using a Gamakatsu wide gap finesse weedless hook and a River2Sea 1/16 oz nail weight. He fished the plastic on an Okuma Helios medium-action spinning rod, paired with a Helios HX-25 spinning reel spooled with 8 lb fluorocarbon.

The punch rig consisted of a green pumpkin/red Flappin’ Hog on a Gamakatsu Super Heavy Duty 3/0 hook with a bobber stopper and a River2Sea 1 oz Trash Bomb. His punch gear was the Okuma 7.11 Heavy Matt Daddy rod, coupled with a Helios 8.1:1 reel, spooled with 65 lb braid.

DAY ONE
Lassagne found himself in cooling temps, gin clear water and flat-calm conditions. This prompted him to head over to an out-of-the-way marina.

Although his strength is flippin’ and punchin’, Lassagne was metering fish in 20 ft on his Garmin 1040 XS and knew he had to go with a deep-water finesse presentation.

Targeting the banks was a popular choice for other contenders; but Lassagne stuck to the deeper water, fishing open slips and backs of boats.

“I was tossing the rig up, letting it sink on a slack line and then waiting for it to start swimming away,” he recalled. “Even though the bite was tough, having the right equipment played a huge role in my success. It started with my rod. The Helios is so light and sensitive, it played a big part in me being able to detect the bite.”

At 11 a.m., Lassagne had a small limit and his co-angler had two keepers, when he decided to go punching to improve his weight. With a short amount of time and a small bite window, he ran about 25 miles to a dead-end slough, fishing slow until the tide started to turn.

“The shallow fish didn’t start to bite until the tide was coming in,” he shared.

Around 12:30 p.m. he got his first shallow punch fish – a 3 ½ pounder. During the next hour, he boated another 3 lb’r. The clocked ticked down, showing only 10 minutes of fish time remaining, when he landed two more largemouth – a 2 ½ and a 3.

Day Two

Day Two

DAY TWO
The night brought in a big northern storm with heavy rain that gave way to sunshine and windy conditions.

With a good high tide, Lassagne decided to forgo the marina bass and head straight to the shallow punch fish.

“I figured it would take a few bigger fish to seal the win,” he stated.

Making a short run from the ramp, Lassagne landed a quick 2 lb’r and gained the confidence to swing for the shallow punch bite. “My next two stops failed to produce any fish; but it didn’t deter me, I know that’s the way it is when you’re fishing for better quality fish,” he said.

The next stop put Lassagne along an inside bend used for fall to winter transition. It was a productive area, landing Lassagne four bass.

As it hit the mid-day mark, Lassagne felt he had a lock on the win with 11 lbs in the well. His co had not fared as nicely and no keepers in the boat. Lassagne returned to the marina, allowing the co three hours to fish for a limit.

Within the hour, his co was culling and ended the two-day event in 2nd place on the non-boater side.

Choosing a Catfish Combo

By Capt. Scott Manning
Okuma Pro / Professional Guide / Outdoor Writer
Licensed US Coast Guard Captain
Website:
www.tennesseestriperfishinguide.com

Catfishing tackle has progressed a long way over the past few years.  We have access to so many well crafted products that picking a rod/reel combo can be a daunting task. Okuma Fishing Tackle has removed the guesswork with the Battle Cat Rod series accompanied with a Coldwater line counter reel.

Catfish

As a professional guide who puts a lot of demand on his equipment; I can say this combo is legit. They fish better, feel better and handle the big catfish with ease whether drifting or anchor fishing.  They are not too bulky which makes them kid friendly and strong enough for any tournament or seasoned angler. They come in both casting and spinning models in 7′ 6″ and 8″ lengths.

The reels come in both right or left handed models with various sizes. I prefer monofilament fishing line; but have had success with braided line as well. An excellent choice for rod holders and/or planer board fishing techniques. My fishing gear has to be made with quality materials, tough, and user friendly.  Being a multi-fish / multi set-up combo makes these Okuma products a staple of my guide business.

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The Battle Cat rods are also sensitive for fishing livebaits, but have enough backbone to pull the big brutes out of heavy structure. With this combo you can feel if something isn’t right, so you don’t need to pull the bait every 10 minutes to check it. The more patient you are and longer your bait is in the water, the more fish you’ll catch.

I use both J-hooks and circle hooks with great success with these combos as well. I often mark fish I see on sonar on my Humminbird GPS and then move upstream and anchor off. Using the Coldwater line counter reels, I can present baits at precise distances downstream to the fish. If I’m drift fishing I can strategically place baits at different depths to target both bottom feeding and suspended catfish.

Hopefully, you will get out and try these combos. Trust me you will not be disappointed with the quailty or feel of this gear.  Always remember to let someone know where you are on the water and be safe.

Okuma Battle Cat Rods Ready for a Fight

Reposted from www.fishing-headquarters.com

By Matt Lynch

An Okuma Battle Cat rod doing work on a big flathead catfish.

If a couple months ago you had asked me about Okuma’s Battle Cat line of cat fishing rods I’d have scratched my head. However recently while discussing the need to update my catfish rod inventory with my good friend and licensed guide, Scott Manning owner of Tennessee River Monsters, brought these rods to my attention.

Being partnered up with Okuma, he recently had the opportunity to check these rods out himself and for someone who spends well over one hundred days on the water putting clients on monster fish, he was very impressed and spoke favorably of them in our talks. After a bit more research on the different models in this line, Scott finally convinced me to purchase some of my own.

Check out the rest of this story here: http://www.fishing-headquarters.com/okumas-battle-cat-rods-are-ready-for-a-fight

Tips For Bagging more Bass in Late Winter/Early Spring

By BASS Pro Jeremy Starks

Late winter/early spring is one of my favorite times to be on the water. This is the best time of the year to catch a giant and knowing a few cold water patterns will make your next trip more successful.

One of my favorite late winter techniques is a jerkbait. The right equipment will make fishing a jerkbait much easier. A lightweight combo will allow you to work the bait properly and without tiring your arm. I start with an Okuma Helios bait casting combo spooled with 10 lb Seaguar Tatsu. I choose the 7′ Helios casting rod in med action paired with a high speed retrieve Helios casting reel. The soft action with a fast tip allows me to cast the bait further and the med action is perfect for treble hooked baits.

Jeremy Starks with a fat early Spring Smallmouth.

As winter winds down the days are getting longer and the water begins to warm. Bass sense that spring is around the corner and begin their annual migration to shallow water. This movement makes locating fish a little easier.

Bass migrate from the main lake into creeks and main lake pockets. Large lay downs that extend over deep water is an excellent place to start looking for migrating females. Start by slowly working the jerkbait in front of the laydown and then along each side. It’s not uncommon to find numerous fish on one tree. Fish will use these locations as a feeding or resting location during their movement and can reload every few hours with a new group of fish.

As the water begins to warm further, fish will continue to move toward the back of creeks. This is a great time work channel banks with a crankbait. Again, the right equipment is paramount. I choose an Okuma Helios spinning reel paired with a 6’10” Okuma C340X spinning rod in light action. I spool the reel with Seaguar Kanzen 10-lb. braid. This combo can’t be beat for getting max distance from a lightweight crankbait.

Zach Meredith hoists a big largie caught on a Savage Gear Finesse Crank.

I start working by channel banks from the main lake toward the back. I like to parallel the bank and make certain to work the deeper water as well. Fish will often suspend 20-40 ft. from shore as they migrate further into the creek.

Working rip rap is another proven pattern this time of year. However, there are some techniques that can increase your chances for success. Looking for small high-percentage sections of rip rap will set you apart from other anglers. Look for sections that receive the most sun, sections that have additional cover (laydowns, wood, docks, vegetation), or just a small isolated section that differs from the surrounding cover. These areas are great places to throw a small crankbait,a shakey head or a finesse jig. I love to throw a 1/4-oz Keitech jig on this type of cover. I throw the little jig on an Okuma Helios 7′ MH casting rod and high speed Helios casting reel.

There is no need to wait for the warm days of late spring and summer. Armed with these techniques you can start the season a little earlier and start catching some fat pre-spawn bass.