Available Now: Ceymar Baitfeeder Reels

AVAILABLE NOW!

Okuma Ceymar Baitfeeder

The Okuma Ceymar spinning reels have been a popular reel around the country and now Baitfeeder reels have joined the Ceymar family. The Ceymar Baitfeeder reels feature an easy to use On/Off auto trip bait feeding system. Once engaged, the secondary drag system puts out very little pressure for your live bait to run nearly freely. In a non live bait situation, when a fish picks up your bait, they feel very little to no pressure from your line allowing them to fully commit to your bait. The Ceymar features a ported machined aluminum anodized spool with LCS lip to reduce line twist and cast and retrieve, as well as an aluminum handle for strength and durability. Its graphite rotor was designed with Okuma’s Cyclonic Flow Rotor to whisk away water as it gathers on the reel to keep it dry and functional. With eight total stainless steel ball bearings, the Ceymar Baitfeeder runs smooth. The Ceymar Baitfeeder is available in three sizes, CBF-40, CBF-55, and CBF-65 and has an MSRP of $74.99- $89.99. The Ceymar Baitfeeder is back by Okuma’s 1-year limited warranty.

Features:

        – On/Off auto trip bait feeding system
– Multi-disc, Japanese oiled felt drag washers
– 7BB+1RB stainless steel bearings
– Quick-Set ant-reverse bearing
– Precision machine cut brass pinion gear
– Corrosion resistant graphite body and rotor
– CFR: Cyclonic Flow Rotor technology
– Precision Elliptical Gearing System
– Rigid metal handle design for strength
– Machined aluminum, 2-tone anodized spool with LCS lip
– Heavy duty solid aluminum bail wire
– RESII: Computer balanced Rotor Equalizing System
– Ceymar reels are backed by a 1-year limited warranty

WATCH VIDEO BELOW!

Introducing the NEW Coronado CDX Baitfeeder Reel

Okuma’s baitfeeding system allows anglers to disengage their spinning reel spool and allow their bait to run freely. The baitfeeding system incorporates a secondary micro-adjustable drag system at the rear of the reel that allows for precise adjustment of the spool for bait control. In order to disengage this system simply turn the handle. The
On/Off lever on the rear of the reel will automatically disengage the baitfeeding system so you can fight your fish with the main drag system.

The new CDX is the third generation of Coronado reels. The Coronado CDX reels feature Okuma’s new slow oscillation system for improved line lay optimization of braided line, and reduced line twist.

The Dual Force Drag system is stabilized by a heavy duty, brass spool shaft stabilizer to keep the drag system aligned and strong, as well as the Hydro Block water tight drag seal to keep water out in the harshest of conditions, and a maximum drag output of over 37lbs of pressure.

CLICK HERE TO SEE VIDEO:Coronado CDX Baitfeeder Reels

Bait Fishing For Trout- Tips and Techniques

When it comes to bait fishing for trout whether it be here locally in one of our many Southern California lakes, or fishing in the High Sierras, there is specific proven method for “bait and wait.

For decades I have been a big fan of the Okuma Avenger Baitfeeder reels, especially the model 20. When coupled with an Okuma SST rod you have a combination that simply cannot be beat in either price or performance.

The Avenger 20 Baitfeeder is perfectly matched for 2 to 4 pound monofilament line. There are two things to remember about trout. First, they can be line shy which is why lighter line and fluorocarbon have become more popular when fishing for these critters. The second thing to remember is that with newer lines comes renewed faith in breaking strength. Where our concern for breaking off fish urged us to go to 6 pound line in the past, modern lines have incredible breaking strength. I have personally landed a number of double digit trout on 2 lb. line. You have to play the fish a little longer on lighter line in order to tire them out, but then again, the battle is half the fun!

So why do I like Okuma Baitfeeder reels so much? Trout tend to be lazy at times and furthermore need to be given proper time to eat the bait. Before the advent of bait runner type reels, we used to screw loose our drags so that when the fish picked up the bait he could swim with it and not feel any pressure. Key to remember was to screw the drag back down before setting the hook. Too often either excitement would over-take sensibility or the angler forgot to reset the drag, or else hastily set it too tight, both resulting in lost opportunities.

Using the Okuma Avenger 20, which by the way is the perfect size and is the only reel of its kind made by any reel manufacturer, everything is preset. Set your drags perfectly and loosen the bait feeder mechanism to its lowest setting which allows line to come off the reel freely when a fish picks it up. All you need to do then is simply turn the handle and set the hook and you are ready to fight your fish!

 

Lightning and Super Trout Fin & Feather

I often fish at the Palmdale Fin & Feather Club where I have been a member for the last 6 years and rely faithfully on this set up: A #6 or #8 Mosquito type hook, bullet weight ranging from 1/16 to ½ oz., small bead and Carolina Keeper. The reason for this type of set up is that it allows for the length of your leader to be shortened or lengthened on the fly in accordance to where the fish are holding.

Here is how you rig it. First, slide the bullet weight or sliding egg sinker on to your line. Next, slide on the small dark colored or clear glass bead (optional). I like this little addition as when you cast your line and it hits the water, when the weight slides against the bead it makes a slight “clicking” sound which often attracts fish. Many times I cast out using this method and get bit instantly. Following the bead pinch and slide your Carolina Keeper onto the line. By simply pinching the keeper and sliding it up and down the line, you can quickly adjust the length of your leader. Finally, tie on your hook, that’s all there is to it.

Now, what do you put on the end of the hook (kind of important right)? There are two methods that work with single hooks, both which work very effectively. Live bait (night crawlers) and Berkeley Mice Tails. Realizing that there are other manufacturers who make similar baits, the reason for the Berkeley brand is that they float. This is very important as bait which sits on the bottom of the lake won’t get bit no matter how bright the colors. Speaking of colors, best combinations for the Mice Tails are pink tail / white head, orange tail / chartreuse head, orange tail / white head and white on white.

When these artificial baits first came out, the tendency was to thread your hook right through the head. This still works okay, but my friend Dave showed me a better way which seems to get more action. Try threading your hook through the “neck” of the Mouse Tail right below the head. Doing this allows the bait to float off the bottom head up, tail down and will bounce up and down with the current.

If your preference is to fish the “bacon” as my buddy Jason affectionately refers to night crawlers, then remember that presentation is key. In order to present a night crawler to a trout in such a way that he will want to eat it, you will need 2 proper tools, a worm threader and a worm blower. Some people like to use the whole worm, but I prefer to use half and then the dark half of the worm as opposed to the lighter half. Call me superstitious, but another friend Big Fish Mike (I know, I have a lot of friends who fish), showed me this method on Lake Crowley the first time we ever fished there. Let me tell you, it made a big difference.

Once you have broken the worm in half, carefully thread it onto the worm threader by inserting the threader just behind the worm collar (this is the light section of the worm just about in the middle which divides the two halves of the worm) and thread it out the section that you have just cut. Once you have threaded your worm onto the hook this allows for air to be injected into the night crawler with the needle pointed at the un-cut end. There are many chambers in this section of the worm all which will hold air insuring that your bait floats off the bottom. Again, fish are not attracted to bait lying at the bottom of the lake.

Some anglers choose to tip the hook with either a salmon egg or even a bright colored Power Egg making it similar to the Mice Tails. Either way, one last important ingredient is to add a strong scent to your bait. Garlic, corn and anise are all commonly used attractants. The boys at Bite On have developed an old family recipe that I swear gets bit 10 to 1 over all other bait attractants. Try their Garlic, Crimson (Garlic with a red tint which helps in stained water) or Maize scents.

The final thing I will touch on is what to do with your rod once you have cast out your bait. You don’t want to miss that bite you have been waiting for all day, so to that end I like to put the odds in my favor by having both a visual as well as audible indicator. When the fish picks up the bait aggressively and starts swimming away with it, the audible part comes by way of the sound the Okuma Avenger 20 makes as line is singing off the reel. However, trout don’t always bite like this and in fact, sometimes swim towards shore rather than away from it. This is where a strike indicator comes in handy.

Strike indicators are easily made with simple household items such as an old wine cork or even an empty Easter egg left over from the kid’s big hunt last year! Simply attach a paper clip or small piece of wire to the egg or cork which will allow it to hang from your fishing line. Once you have cast your line and the bait has settled to the bottom reel up all of the slack and then set it into your rod holder (no need to hold the rod in your hands). Be sure to lift the Baitrunner mechanism at the back of the reel which allows for the line to come off the reel without resistance and now gently hang the strike indicator on the line about in the middle of the rod. When the fish picks up your bait and starts to swim away with it, before line starts coming off of the reel you will see the strike indicator pull up. Conversely, if the fish is swimming towards shore the indicator will begin to fall down.

Trout season is just now starting here in the southland and before you know it the Sierras will be back in business, God willing and the snow falls this year of course. Wherever you wind up with a line in the water put these quality Okuma products and techniques to use and catch that wall hanger!

Article by Brett Edmondson, Santa Clarita, CA
Submitted November 2015