Komodo SS-Stainless Steel

The New Okuma Komodo SS Casting Reel not only has amazing levels of drag output to take on the largest fish, but it stainless steel main gear, stainless steel pinion gear, along with its heavy duty stainless steel drive, and spool shafts offer serious power and durability.

This powerful reel can take on the largest freshwater fish like pike, musky and salmon, along with the toughest inshore species like stripers, jacks and trophy calico bass. The ALC: Rigid diecast aluminum frame and sideplates form a rigid, but lightweight platform that is comfortable to fish, and ensures consistently smooth casts and retrieves.

The Komodo SS is corrosion resistant with stainless steel bearings. It’s available in both right and left hand retrieve, and is backed by a 3-year limited warranty.

Nomad Travel Rod Review by Fish’n Crazee Show

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We needed a Rod Series we could travel with effortlessly with our filming gear and minimize big rod tubes in airports and planes with one piece rods without trading in AIR MILES! We asked the staff at Okuma if they developed a rod that can handle heavy saltwater fish from Alaska to the Gulf of Mexico and everything in between. So the Nomad series shows up and what a well designed & crafted rod. The water resistant bag firstly organizes each piece of the rod neatly and also offers not one but TWO tip actions!… This is great without sacrificing space and also gives you options based on what lure or bait you using for multiple species…. PLUS its YOUR rod and reel combo. Often times you get to a lodge or guide boat and their gear is broken in sometimes too well and that leaves you feeling “ok maybe I should have brought something I’m used too”.
With lengths up to 7’ and actions from Light to Medium Heavy and line class use from 10lb to 60lb you have every option available to target big grouper, amberjacks, rooster fish and the odd toothy critter! We chose to pair up with the Okuma Azores Z-65S Spinning Reel Series ( 5.4:1 ratio, 44lb max drag, 42” of line per turn of the handle!) and zero disappointments so far!

This travel set up makes it user friendly and will handle most species. Along with looking the part , the reel seat being able to hold the right size reel , eva grips , the rod guides with zirconium inserts should makes your fishing adventure that much more personal!…. So with this side of the packing made easier we can now bring more cameras!.. Remember take only what you will eat. Catch , Photograph & Release!

By Xavier Tiberghien ( Host of “The Fish’n Crazee TV Show”)

The Fish’n Crazee Show’s TCS Rod Review



Okuma 3

Okuma delivered their latest OKUMA TCS series rod and Helios reel combo / set up for us to look into within many of our Fish’n Crazee Adventures. Well like the other Helios Series we have used successfully this series delivered too. Firstly know the reel speed you want, the series we tried was an 8.1:1 ratio simply to measure the difference between the 7.3:1 on the other models and yes the difference is clear… there is limited slack on any fish looking to surge towards you once hooked or attacking a bait with this reel. You can pick up the slack faster and regain control in many situations. Along with all the engineering qualities that are on offer looking at from fishing point of view this is one work horse reel.

From a castability point of view it takes a little getting used to measuring the type of lures and weights you wish to throw. You almost feel like you want to throw every lure with this set up as its pretty lightweight. However crankbaits & some moving baits need to be thrown on the right style rods that Okuma offers along with a slower retrieve ratio reel ( 5.4:1 Komodo or 6.6:1 Helios TCS). You need the forgiveness of a softer action rod for the crankbaits you wish to throw and also need a stiffer faster action for jig or worm fishing so make sure you pair up right for the right results. I did find that the higher speed reel with topwaters and some moving baits was a slight adjustment in cadence because of the higher speed which was great because you don’t have to work it as hard since the reel picks up the slack pretty well.

Luck would have it while we trying our best to get a review done with the bass market in mind we managed to hook many other species including Stripers, Hybrid Bass, Catfish. One particular case was a 20lb flathead catfish thought a jigging spoon would make a nice snack… with 12lb line the rod and reel combo handled the fight with ease, the TCS drag tired the large fish out and after a few smooth surging runs , we landed , photographed and released the fish! ( see attached pictures)… So that being said it should handle a lot of your bass fishing objectives

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Compare if you must however if you looking for a reel that is comfortable, small in the palm of your hand for all day use and less fatigue due to its lightweight design you pretty much have dynamic combination along with the TCS rod for the application you want…. In comparable class you will get every dime in value and the results will speak for themselves.

 

By Xavier Tiberghien ( Host of “The Fish’n Crazee TV Show”)

National Walleye Tour Round 1 with Okuma Pro Dan Hassevoort

         Okuma Inspired Fishing and Savage Gear Pro Dan Hassevoort is gearing up for round one of the National Walleye Tour in Sandusky, Ohio on Lake Erie. The National Walleye Tour is the top stage in professional Walleye fishing and Okuma Pro Dan Hassevoort knows what it takes to be competitive fishing against the world’s top anglers.

 

Okuma Pro Dan Hassevoort

Okuma Pro Dan Hassevoort

Radio: So Dan where is your head at right now just before you leave for a tournament of this magnitude?

Dan: Well, right now it’s all about getting the right gear together to be prepared for anything at this time of the year. You could find yourself jigging on the reef systems for spawning females or trolling deep water for the big females that already moved off the reefs. It’s all about timing and you have to assess the situation once you get there. My trolling arsenal is composed of the Okuma Cold Water Low Pro files CW-354D paired up with the Okuma Dead Eye Trolling Rod DE-CBR-861-MT.

Okuma Cold Water Low Profile Line Counter Reel

Okuma Cold Water Low Profile Line Counter Reel

Radio: Why is this particular trolling combo so important to you and your fishing?

Dan: You need a rod that is versatile so you can be pulling planer boards and crank baits at one moment and then change up to lead core or snap weights. The DE-CBR 861-MT allows me to do all of that. The Cold Water Low Profile CW-354D gives me the perfect retrieve speed to get those big females in without horsing them but not taking too much time to allow the Walleye to work itself free. The low profile has enough line capacity to hold up to three colors of lead core which is more than enough to target the deep water tournament winning walleyes.

Okuma Cold Water and

Okuma Cold Water and

Okuma Inspired Fishing Pro Dan Hassevoort is a former 2008 FLW Angler of the Year so winning is nothing new to this angler.

Radio: I understand that you like to jig deep reefs.  What is the best program for jigging the reefs?

Dan: I like the Trio 20 paired up with the 7 foot Dead Eye Jigging rod DE-S-701-MFT – I like the longer rod because I can vertical jig this rod and  it gives me a good casting range for throwing cranks baits or Savage Gear Fat Vibes over the top of the reefs.

Savage Gear Fat Vibe

Savage Gear Fat Vibe

Radio: What kind of baits will you be using at this tournament?

Dan: Well, with the water being as cold as it is now I think crank baits will probably be the ticket. Trolling the Savage Gear 4 Play on lead core will be a go to bait along with the Savage Gear Manic Prey. If I am fishing on the reefs the Savage Gear Fat Vibes are pretty effective along with the Sand Eels on lead head jigs.

Savage Gear Fat Vibe

Savage Gear Fat Vibe

 

Savage Gear Sand Eel

Savage Gear Sand Eel

Savage Gear Manic Prey

Savage Gear Manic Prey

Radio: Lake Erie is home to some of the biggest Walleyes in the country, so Dan, what is it going to take to win an event against the world’s top anglers?

Dan: Well my target weight for two days of competition for five fish is going to be 40 to 45 pounds which is a difficult task but that’s what it is going to take to win this event along with some long runs across some brutally rough water.

Dan Hassevoort

Dan Hassevoort

 

Dan Hassevoort has been on the Okuma and Savage Gear Pro Staff for a couple of years now, and has made us very proud up in the Midwest. 

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Building the Okuma Makaira Reels

We’ve all been out fishing and have seen a variety of styles and brands of reels on on various boats.  One reel that has really taken the offshore market by storm is the Okuma Makaira Lever Drag reel.  The Makaira is the flagship of the Okuma lineup, and has been so for a good four plus years now.  With extensive testing and input from the leaders in the industry, including Cal Sheets and the engineers at Tiburon, the Makaira was built to be the best reel on the market.

Makaira Cut Out

With a full family of sizes from an 8 to a 130, the Makaira has you covered.  Also available in a couple of Special Edition configurations, featuring open bearings, TSI-301 oil, larger handle design on a couple models, and a tuna etched on the side.  The Special Edition reel is also available in Gun Smoke, Silver, and a limited amount of Black.

Makaira SEaPeople often ask us the intricacies involved in building a reel like the Makaira.  It just so happens that a TV show was filmed in Taiwan over that past few weeks on the actual production of the Makaira Reels.  This was filmed at the factory in Taiwan and features some fun fishing footage, as well as some great insight into how these reels are actually produced.

As previously mentioned, the Makaira reels have been having great success and have accounted for hundreds of big fish.  In Southern California, the Makaira has become a staple in the long range fishery, and being fished by such sport boats as the Excel, Red Rooster III, Apollo, Royal Star, Intrepid, Maximus, and the list goes on.

Here are a couple of catches from the past couple seasons on the Makaira.
image (1) image Kevin Matson Okuma sign 20150221_045545_resized 20150221_113431_resized 20150222_025015_resized Apollo Rack

For more information on the Makaira lineup of reels, please visit http://www.okumafishingusa.com/product/view/reels/lever-drag-reels/makaira

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Okuma Metaloid expanding its family of reels

The Okuma Metaloid has been a solid reel in the Okuma line up for a couple of seasons now capturing many a big fish.  With the incredible SoCal Saltwater season we had last year, these reels were definitely put to the test.  This year, Okuma has added left hand reels into the lineup.  We have also added a couple new colors into the fold.

The Metaloid M-5IIB

The Metaloid M-5IIR

 

Here is a video by Okuma Product Manager John Bretza talking about the expansion of the Metaloid family.

Okuma Fishing Tackle prides itself on inspiring participation in fishing and creating a better angling experience. When fishing for hard-fighting species like tunas, yellowtail, groupers or stripers there’s no greater frustration than trying to bear down on fish with the opposite hand than is comfortable.  In follow up to the blistering success of the initial Metaloid lever drag introduction, Okuma is introducing a pair of 2-speed models in left-hand retrieve for 2016. Left-handed Metaloid introductions include the M-5IILX and the M-12IILX for exceptional versatility. Additionally, both the size 5 and 12 are now available with the angler’s choice of either matching red or blue spool, drag lever and handle arm. Same incredible reel, now in full black, black/red or black/blue.

Learn more about the Okuma Metaloid family of reels at http://www.okumafishingusa.com/product/view/reels/lever-drag-reels/metaloid
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Target Big Fish on Makaira Popping Rods

By Capt. Rich AntoninoLarge Catch

 

There is nothing quite like hooking a fish and saying to yourself “is this fish too big to EVER land?”. That is the game that we play every day off of the coast of Massachusetts when targeting Bluefin tuna on spinning gear. It’s not fishing for rookies. It’s the type of fishing that can be equated to big game hunting, but with a spinning rod, not a gun. I’ve been doing this for a living for a decade and I have seen some of the greatest improvements in tackle heavily influenced by our efforts and experiences.

First, don’t bring a knife to a gun fight! When we see a school of Bluefin tuna feeding, there are times when 500lb fish are feeding alongside 100lb fish. The gear that can handle a 100lb fish will crumble under the battle that a true giant will unleash. As a field tester for Okuma, I’ve pushed tackle past its intended uses and through its comfort zone. I’ve broken enough reels and bent enough rods to know what works and what doesn’t. I’m proud to say that the Okuma Makaira popping rods are the real deal. They can handle whatever you throw at them.
How big is too big? 305lb Bluefin tuna? This fall, we landed an 82” beast on a Savage Gear Sandeel. That is the biggest that we have landed so far, but that’s not the part of the story that is important, nor shows how good the rods are holding up. We landed that fish in 65 minutes while fishing in 500’ of water. That is to say, we KICKED THAT FISH’S BUTT HARD AND FAST! This is where quality tackle and experience plays a huge part in fighting these fish.

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The best example of fighting a fish came several years ago, when a customer hooked his first tuna on spinning gear. He wanted to fight the fish solo. He had plenty of experience using light tackle for striped bass and bluefish, so he knew how to use drag to fight a fish. His battle took 85 minutes and the fish was….62” long and about 135lb. It was a great fish, but… I told him that if he knew how hard he could push his gear and had the experience of fighting a big fish like that; he would have landed it in about 15 minutes. He didn’t know what he didn’t know. After hundreds of tuna, I know what you have to do to land these fish.
The right rod. The right reel. Strong braided line. Perfect knots. The right hooks/hardware. And more people to help you fight the fish. This is what you need…
Have the right rod with enough backbone to lift that fish during a tuna’s famous “death circle”. The Makaira Popping rods are affordable (about $219) and tough enough for this. I have no doubts as I have tested them harder than probably anyone on Earth. A 7’6” rod is great for casting and doesn’t give up anything when it comes to fighting a fish around the boat.

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Fight the fish with enough drag to stop it in a reasonable amount of time. It’s not uncommon to fight a fish with 30+ pounds of drag coming off of the reel, and then palm the spool to increase the drag and turn the fish’s head. If you have never held a spinning rod using this much drag, try it. Use a “Cush It” to lessen the stomach/groin pain from the butt of the rod, or use a gimble. Remember that 30lb of drag running away from the boat is a different feel than 30lb pulling straight under the boat! When that fish is under the boat, never let the line hit the boat and watch the angle of the line to the rod to avoid “high sticking” which will usually snap the rod right about the 3rd guide… Your pulling power is best from “5 to 3” on the “universal clock”. To maximize this technique, think “get one crank”. You’ll hear the best captains yelling “get a crank!!!” over and over. Short strokes gain line. Remember that. Each crank is 4’.. When that fish is buried 50’ under the boat, you only need 12 cranks to land it.. Even better…get 24 half-cranks quickly. When that fish’s head turns, DON’T LET UP!
I have used many different reels to target these fish, but the list of appropriate reels to target the biggest fish is very short. Okuma is adding one to the mix that I am happy to say I have tried and successfully vetted on these big fish. It is with an early prototype reel that we landed our biggest fish to date. I fished a later prototype and it was markedly improved. I’m sure that the latest version will be even better. When it is introduced, another giant Bluefin tuna reel will be on the market. I’m excited about this reel. If you are using a reel that isn’t appropriate, you will either ruin it, you’ll lose your fish, or you’ll fight the fish for much, much longer than necessary. The rule of thumb with tuna is that “the longer you fight it, the greater your chances of losing it are” (that’s the opposite of shark fishing, but that’s another story).
100lb Guide’s Choice hollow core line from Tuf-Line. There is no room for backing; you fill the entire spool with it. You’ll have more than 400 yards of line on your reel…and you may need it all! Splice a nine foot 100lb fluorocarbon leader into the end or end it with a loop and use a windon leader. You do not want any knots connecting your leader. No discussion here. Period.
We end our line with a Palomar knot to a Spro power swivel/split ring to which we attach our lures. Once again. No discussion. This is how it’s done. We have never broken this connection.
Finally, you want help. We no longer let guys fight fish for more than 20 minutes. If you can last longer than that, you are not fighting it hard enough. There are times near the end of the battle when we are fighting the fish for one minute shifts, just like hockey. We fight these fish so hard that it becomes a team effort while landing it. Remember, it’s the thrill of the chase, the hook up, and the battle as much as it is the excitement of finally landing it.

 

joe
Get out there and have fun; in the offseason, fire away with all of your questions and I’ll be happy to help. During the season (late May – early December), I’ll see you on my boat where you can get the best lessons in person! I can’t wait to see what 2016 has to offer and you can find me at www.blackrosefishing.com or on my Facebook Page

(https://www.facebook.com/Black-Rose-Fishing-105895832818219/)

My number is 508-269-1882 or captain@blackrosefishing.com. We target Bluefin tuna from New Hampshire to Rhode Island and offer full lodging/fishing packages for anglers or whole families.

For more information on the Makaira family of rods, please visit http://www.okumafishingusa.com/product/view/rods/saltwater-1/makaira-abalone

 

Bait Fishing For Trout- Tips and Techniques

When it comes to bait fishing for trout whether it be here locally in one of our many Southern California lakes, or fishing in the High Sierras, there is specific proven method for “bait and wait.

For decades I have been a big fan of the Okuma Avenger Baitfeeder reels, especially the model 20. When coupled with an Okuma SST rod you have a combination that simply cannot be beat in either price or performance.

The Avenger 20 Baitfeeder is perfectly matched for 2 to 4 pound monofilament line. There are two things to remember about trout. First, they can be line shy which is why lighter line and fluorocarbon have become more popular when fishing for these critters. The second thing to remember is that with newer lines comes renewed faith in breaking strength. Where our concern for breaking off fish urged us to go to 6 pound line in the past, modern lines have incredible breaking strength. I have personally landed a number of double digit trout on 2 lb. line. You have to play the fish a little longer on lighter line in order to tire them out, but then again, the battle is half the fun!

So why do I like Okuma Baitfeeder reels so much? Trout tend to be lazy at times and furthermore need to be given proper time to eat the bait. Before the advent of bait runner type reels, we used to screw loose our drags so that when the fish picked up the bait he could swim with it and not feel any pressure. Key to remember was to screw the drag back down before setting the hook. Too often either excitement would over-take sensibility or the angler forgot to reset the drag, or else hastily set it too tight, both resulting in lost opportunities.

Using the Okuma Avenger 20, which by the way is the perfect size and is the only reel of its kind made by any reel manufacturer, everything is preset. Set your drags perfectly and loosen the bait feeder mechanism to its lowest setting which allows line to come off the reel freely when a fish picks it up. All you need to do then is simply turn the handle and set the hook and you are ready to fight your fish!

 

Lightning and Super Trout Fin & Feather

I often fish at the Palmdale Fin & Feather Club where I have been a member for the last 6 years and rely faithfully on this set up: A #6 or #8 Mosquito type hook, bullet weight ranging from 1/16 to ½ oz., small bead and Carolina Keeper. The reason for this type of set up is that it allows for the length of your leader to be shortened or lengthened on the fly in accordance to where the fish are holding.

Here is how you rig it. First, slide the bullet weight or sliding egg sinker on to your line. Next, slide on the small dark colored or clear glass bead (optional). I like this little addition as when you cast your line and it hits the water, when the weight slides against the bead it makes a slight “clicking” sound which often attracts fish. Many times I cast out using this method and get bit instantly. Following the bead pinch and slide your Carolina Keeper onto the line. By simply pinching the keeper and sliding it up and down the line, you can quickly adjust the length of your leader. Finally, tie on your hook, that’s all there is to it.

Now, what do you put on the end of the hook (kind of important right)? There are two methods that work with single hooks, both which work very effectively. Live bait (night crawlers) and Berkeley Mice Tails. Realizing that there are other manufacturers who make similar baits, the reason for the Berkeley brand is that they float. This is very important as bait which sits on the bottom of the lake won’t get bit no matter how bright the colors. Speaking of colors, best combinations for the Mice Tails are pink tail / white head, orange tail / chartreuse head, orange tail / white head and white on white.

When these artificial baits first came out, the tendency was to thread your hook right through the head. This still works okay, but my friend Dave showed me a better way which seems to get more action. Try threading your hook through the “neck” of the Mouse Tail right below the head. Doing this allows the bait to float off the bottom head up, tail down and will bounce up and down with the current.

If your preference is to fish the “bacon” as my buddy Jason affectionately refers to night crawlers, then remember that presentation is key. In order to present a night crawler to a trout in such a way that he will want to eat it, you will need 2 proper tools, a worm threader and a worm blower. Some people like to use the whole worm, but I prefer to use half and then the dark half of the worm as opposed to the lighter half. Call me superstitious, but another friend Big Fish Mike (I know, I have a lot of friends who fish), showed me this method on Lake Crowley the first time we ever fished there. Let me tell you, it made a big difference.

Once you have broken the worm in half, carefully thread it onto the worm threader by inserting the threader just behind the worm collar (this is the light section of the worm just about in the middle which divides the two halves of the worm) and thread it out the section that you have just cut. Once you have threaded your worm onto the hook this allows for air to be injected into the night crawler with the needle pointed at the un-cut end. There are many chambers in this section of the worm all which will hold air insuring that your bait floats off the bottom. Again, fish are not attracted to bait lying at the bottom of the lake.

Some anglers choose to tip the hook with either a salmon egg or even a bright colored Power Egg making it similar to the Mice Tails. Either way, one last important ingredient is to add a strong scent to your bait. Garlic, corn and anise are all commonly used attractants. The boys at Bite On have developed an old family recipe that I swear gets bit 10 to 1 over all other bait attractants. Try their Garlic, Crimson (Garlic with a red tint which helps in stained water) or Maize scents.

The final thing I will touch on is what to do with your rod once you have cast out your bait. You don’t want to miss that bite you have been waiting for all day, so to that end I like to put the odds in my favor by having both a visual as well as audible indicator. When the fish picks up the bait aggressively and starts swimming away with it, the audible part comes by way of the sound the Okuma Avenger 20 makes as line is singing off the reel. However, trout don’t always bite like this and in fact, sometimes swim towards shore rather than away from it. This is where a strike indicator comes in handy.

Strike indicators are easily made with simple household items such as an old wine cork or even an empty Easter egg left over from the kid’s big hunt last year! Simply attach a paper clip or small piece of wire to the egg or cork which will allow it to hang from your fishing line. Once you have cast your line and the bait has settled to the bottom reel up all of the slack and then set it into your rod holder (no need to hold the rod in your hands). Be sure to lift the Baitrunner mechanism at the back of the reel which allows for the line to come off the reel without resistance and now gently hang the strike indicator on the line about in the middle of the rod. When the fish picks up your bait and starts to swim away with it, before line starts coming off of the reel you will see the strike indicator pull up. Conversely, if the fish is swimming towards shore the indicator will begin to fall down.

Trout season is just now starting here in the southland and before you know it the Sierras will be back in business, God willing and the snow falls this year of course. Wherever you wind up with a line in the water put these quality Okuma products and techniques to use and catch that wall hanger!

Article by Brett Edmondson, Santa Clarita, CA
Submitted November 2015

Okuma Azores Reels Getting Serious Workout in Australia

Here at Okuma USA, we get reports from all over, but here’s a good one with some great photos from our Okuma agents in Australia:

I have been really impressed with the Okuma Azores 55 reel I have been using over the last 3 months.  I took it out fishing with me for over 60 days during this period.  I caught 112 fish on it, mainly kingfish and bluefin tuna, some over 20kg in weight.  I didn’t service it or oil the drag and it stood up to a good bit of a beating.  When I added it up, the reel would have caught over a ton of fish during this period, which is pretty good for a reel that retails for under $200!  I enjoyed using it  and the quick change handle from left to right and the removal of the anti-reverse switch are both great improvements.  I’m sure these reels will represent value for money.

 Cheers,

 Scott Gray

Okuma Battle Cat Rods Ready for a Fight

Reposted from www.fishing-headquarters.com

By Matt Lynch

An Okuma Battle Cat rod doing work on a big flathead catfish.

If a couple months ago you had asked me about Okuma’s Battle Cat line of cat fishing rods I’d have scratched my head. However recently while discussing the need to update my catfish rod inventory with my good friend and licensed guide, Scott Manning owner of Tennessee River Monsters, brought these rods to my attention.

Being partnered up with Okuma, he recently had the opportunity to check these rods out himself and for someone who spends well over one hundred days on the water putting clients on monster fish, he was very impressed and spoke favorably of them in our talks. After a bit more research on the different models in this line, Scott finally convinced me to purchase some of my own.

Check out the rest of this story here: http://www.fishing-headquarters.com/okumas-battle-cat-rods-are-ready-for-a-fight